Apply Now for a Heartbeat Scholarship

IMG_9696Each year Heartbeat provides several scholarships to make the practice of retreat and pilgrimage accessible to all. Our goal is to deepen an individual’s spiritual journey and to ground, sustain, and enhance their efforts towards healing and transformation in their own unique context. While on pilgrimage, participants learn spiritual practices to cultivate compassion, mindfulness, and foster a spirit of collaborative action. Ideal candidates demonstrate experience and ongoing work towards peacemaking, healing and transformation in the world. Demonstration of financial need is a requirement to receive scholarship funds.

For more information on applying for a Heartbeat scholarship, please see below. To contribute to our Pilgrimage Scholarship Fund, please click here.

Iona Pilgrimage, St Columba Hotel, Isle of Iona, Scotland

IMG_8579 - Version 216-23 September 2017 | Award: $1,140 | Application deadline:  2 April 2017

Application fee: $10

Registration fee for scholarship recipients: $100 (invoiced through PayPal)

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Each day on Iona will begin and end with the rhythm of prayer and meditation together, either at the Abbey or elsewhere on the island. John Philip will teach on themes related to the oneness of the human soul and the healing of creation, asking what sacrifices we are to make in our lives as individuals, as nations, and as a species, if we and the world are to be well. Click here for more event information.

This scholarship includes lodging, breakfast, dinner, and program fees. Because of limited availability applicants must be willing to share a room (if applying with a friend or family member, please indicate in the appropriate field on the application).

Instructions: fill out the online form by clicking here and have a letter of reference from a mentor, teacher, or advisor sent to Ben Lindwall (ben@heartbeatjourney.org) by 2 April 2017. A Heartbeat Selection Committee will review all applications and notify successful candidates by 12 April 2017. The funds will then be transferred to the St. Columba Hotel in the recipient’s name, pending the payment of the registration fee.

Additional cost to recipient: travel expenses to get to Iona and lunch each day.

Ghost Ranch, Abiquiu, New Mexico, USA

17-23 July 2017 | Award: $1,015 | Application deadline: 2 April 2016

Application fee: $10

Registration fee for scholarship recipients: $100 (invoiced through PayPal)

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One of the most cherished images in the early Celtic Christian world is the memory of John the Beloved leaning against Jesus at the last supper. It was said of him that he thus heard the heartbeat of God. He became a symbol of the practice of listening, listening for the beat of the Sacred deep within ourselves, within one another, and within the body of the earth. This spiritual tradition has many resonances with Native American spirituality and the wisdom of indigenous peoples throughout the world.

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In our signature week at Ghost Ranch, we will honor this wisdom through Native ceremony and look to the treasure of Celtic spirituality as a rich resource for transformation in our lives and world today. Our days will consist of prayer at the rising of the sun in Ghost Ranch’s Agape Center courtyard, teaching and sharing in the mornings and evenings, and rest and silence in the afternoons. The program will be led by John Philip and Ali Newell who this year will be deepening and expanding their Celtic teachings, along with the musical talent of David and Winona Poole and the Navajo wisdom of Alta Begay-Piechowski and Terrell Piechowski. They are all good friends of Ghost Ranch and have worked together creatively in the past through word and song and ceremony. For more details, click here.

This scholarship includes lodging, meals, and program fees. Because of limited availability applicants must be willing to share a room (if applying with a friend or family member, please indicate in the appropriate field on the application).

Instructions: fill out the online form by clicking here and have a letter of reference from a mentor, teacher, or advisor sent to Ben Lindwall (ben@heartbeatjourney.org) by 2 April 2017. A Heartbeat Selection Committee will review all applications and notify successful candidates by 12 April 2017. The funds will then be transferred to Ghost Ranch in their name, pending the payment of the registration fee.

Additional cost to recipient: travel expenses to get to Ghost Ranch.

Virginia School of Celtic Consciousness, Richmond, Virginia, USA

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Heartbeat has four $374 Scholarship Awards available to go towards meals, lodging (sharing a room with someone of similar gender), and program fees at the Virginia School of Celtic Consciousness. There are also two $184 Scholarship Awards Scholarship for commuters to go towards the program fee and meals. Recipients are responsible for their own transportation to/from the event as well as the remaining registration balance of $100.

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Apply by filling out the online application and have a letter of reference sent to Ben Lindwall (ben@heartbeatjourney.org) by May 1, 2017. Heartbeat’s Selection Committee will review all applications and notify successful candidates by May 10.

 

Space available at the Colorado School of Celtic Consciousness, April 4-6

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Join us April 4-6, 2017 for an experiential time of learning, prayer, & chant rooted in the Celtic vision with acclaimed Scottish teacher, Rev. Dr. John Philip Newell at the beautiful Shambhala Mountain Center in Red Feather Lakes, Colorado.

Click below

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This is the second annual gathering of the Colorado School of Celtic Consciousness, to nurture a community of shared vision and spiritual practice for transformation in our lives and world. Open to all, both to those who attended the first gathering in 2016 and those who wish to explore. Teachings will focus on the central themes of Celtic Spirituality, the sacredness of the earth and the human soul. And practices will concentrate on sustainable contemplative disciplines for individual wellbeing and collective healing.

Our daily schedule will consist of prayer at the beginning and ending of each day, presentations by John Philip Newell, followed by meditative practices, silence, and sharing. Meals will be shared in common and there will be free time to hike and rest as well as a party on the last evening to celebrate our time together.

Located in the Northern Rockies of Colorado,  The Shambhala Mountain Center is a peaceful retreat nestled between breathtaking mountain views. The event will be held in the main lodge with plenty of space indoors and outdoors for quiet reflection, and space to converse with old and new friends. We will gather at 4pm on Tuesday, April 4th and conclude after lunch on Thursday, April 6th. Space is limited so register soon!

Lodging options

Rates include retreat program fees, meals, lodging, and use of the Shambhala Mountain Center facilities. Due to accommodation constraints, all attendees are required to stay on-site. Click here for more information about the rooms at the Shambhala Mountain Center.

$418 – Lodge Dormshared room, twin bed, shared bathroom

$494 – Lodge Double, shared room, queen beds (2), full private bath (partners and friends wishing to share a room must register separately and enter roommate requests under “special requests”)

$534 – Lodge Single Monk, private room, full size bed, shared bathroom

$618 – Lodge Single (price for one guest), private room, full or queen size bed, private bath

(You may add up to one additional person to the Lodge Single Suite for $284)

FULL $726 – Lodge Junior Suite (price for one guest), private room, queen size bed, full private bath

(You may add up to one additional person to the Lodge Junior Suite for $368)

Registration instructions:

1. Enter your personal information

2. Select lodging option – you may register up to two people for the “Lodge Junior Suite” or the “Lodge Single”. After selecting either of these options, please fill out the guest information portion of the form and select the corresponding lodging option. “Lodge Double” is single registration only but you may request a roommate, or we can assign a roommate with a similar gender.

3. Enter your payment information via Paypal or send a check to:

Heartbeat 
5431 NE 20th Ave
Portland, OR 97211
 
Questions? For event related questions, please contact Jan Silverstein at rjrace@earthnet.net. To inquire about registration, please contact Ben Lindwall at ben@heartbeatjourney.org 
 

Click below

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Joy As a Form of Spiritual Resistance | John Philip Newell

Iona SunriseRecently I returned to Edinburgh from San Francisco and the launching of the California School of Celtic Consciousness. It was a strong beginning, both in terms of numbers and depth of engagement. Many arrived feeling overwhelmed by this moment in time, struggling to know how to confront the falseness of a system that is denying the sacred right of refugees to sanctuary, the inviolable right of religions to equality, the holy right of women to reverence, and the divine right of the earth to protection. Through teachings and spiritual practices drawn from the well of Celtic wisdom we moved together to a place of deeper hope and vision.

unspecifiedAlways in our lives we need soul-force to confront what is wrong, just as we need soul-force to powerfully witness to what is true. Perhaps part of the sin that we need now to confess is that we were lulled into a false sense of wellbeing and consequently thought we didn’t need to intentionally access the soul-force of God that is within us. If that was the case, then we are at a waking-up point. Maybe now, like never before in our lives, we are realising the need for spiritual resistance to what is false and spiritual insistence of what is true.

One of the young mothers at our California School remembered that when her son was a baby she used to hold him in her arms and dance around the kitchen, singing a chant. Over the years, through changing circumstances, she let go of this practice. At the California School she vowed to find again a spiritual practice of joy that she could share with her son. She realised that joy is a form of spiritual resistance. If she is to be strong for this moment in time, and if her son is to receive true strength through her, she needs to nurture joy of soul.
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I hope you will join us for the upcoming gathering of the School in Colorado, or at one of the other locations over the coming year, to build on the joy and vision and spiritual discipline that are essential for the work of change at this moment in time. More urgently than ever we need to access soul-force.
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With love and blessings to you,
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John Philip

Heartbeat Announces $5,000 Grant to Annunciation House

Ruben GarciaHeartbeat announces $5,000 grant to Annunciation House to

support refugee relief on U.S. – Mexico border

“When I speak to congregations, everybody understands the gospel meaning of welcoming the stranger.”  So said Ruben Garcia, director of Annunciation House in El Paso, Texas, when I spoke to him last week. While the moral imperative to welcome the stranger is clear in the abstract, it is often difficult to put into practice for many.  Father Garcia has been welcoming migrants and refugees for nearly 40 years at his center in the heart of his downtown El Paso, at the geographic center of the U.S.-Mexico border.  The humble building on a triangular lot has provided shelter to more than 100,000 migrants.  Today he considers the political climate chilling and our immigration system increasingly unjust with devastating consequences to families.

Annunciation HouseAbout a month ago, Annunciation House was receiving roughly 1,000 refugees a week; that number has slowed to a trickle.  The U.S. has moved to a detention model for many asylum seekers, and Annunciation House usually receives migrants who have recently been released from detention.  Mexico is ill-equipped to handle the global refugees that continue to pour into their country headed north, after a trek across the Central American jungle, often through as many as eight countries.

We at Heartbeat are concerned with the global refugee crisis, which according to the U.N. Refugee Agency saw numbers of displaced people reach a global high in 2016, surpassing even the numbers from World War II.  The Refugee Fund that we established last year in honor of John Philip Newell’s father has already funded a group of students who set up solar charging stations on the island of Lesbos.
Today, we announce that Heartbeat is providing a donation of $5,000 to Annunciation House in El Paso as they continue their refugee work, meeting not only the immediate needs of individuals and families, but advocating for a humane response to the plight of migrants and fighting against the rampant misinformation that is informing recent policy decisions in the U.S.  While this amount is nominal based on the needs of this organization (food, diapers, clothing, formula, maintenance), we hope to challenge others to support this important work.
We recognize the plight of migrants worldwide, we celebrate the universal human family, and we say to those who are coming here fleeing war and violence, “We Stand With You” and “Estamos con ustedes!”
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Vanessa Johnson, Treasurer for Heartbeat
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El Paso, Texas
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To support future initiatives responding to the refugee crises, please make a contribution to the William James Newell Refugee Fund.

Rob Bell Interviews John Philip Newell

JPN & Rob Bell
“There is an awareness that Christianity as we know it is in trouble.”
-John Philip Newell
Rob Bell interviews John Philip Newell in a discussion that delves into his most recent publication,  The Rebirthing of God . Recorded for the “Robcast at St Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, Virginia, USA,  Rob skillfully guides a fascinating conversation that explores the movements within Christian spirituality in our time. The chemistry between these two teachers makes for a conversation that you don’t want to miss!
Click here to stream the Robcast

From Pilgrimage to Creativity Workshops

Last year I received a Heartbeat scholarship for a pilgrimage to the Isle of Iona with John Philip Newell.  It was a unique experience in a magical place, and I am still incredibly grateful to have been gifted that experience.  To be on that island, which has such a long history, where the weather changes every half an hour and the land is so often shrouded in mist, it’s not hard to feel a strong connection to the spiritual.

One of the messages I took from my time with John Philip was that it’s up to me to create the world I want to live in, for myself and for others.

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Iona pilgrims Kathryn Shanks (left), Cami Twilling (center), and Ian Brownlee (right)

There’s a thread that runs through all Celtic Christian teaching that says the world is just fine as it is, and you are whole as you are.  This idea is counter to mainstream Christianity, which is based around the idea of original sin.  When we see the world as a place that has fallen from grace, nature is not sacred, trees are not alive, and nothing that comes innately from ourselves is good.  What a sad philosophy.  It’s no wonder that this attitude has given way to secular western materialism.  The philosophy that comes from the Celtic tradition is much healthier.  It says that what comes from nature is good, and therefore our own human nature is good.  We don’t need to be purified of the evil that is within us, we accept ourselves and embrace our own nature, which includes our sexuality and our creativity.

For as long as I can remember I’ve wanted to be an artist.  It has always come naturally to me (though whether it’s coming from me or through me I don’t know.)  I have always found that when I try to steer my creativity, or in any way to impose my conscious will on this unconscious process, it doesn’t work.  Creativity is a wild thing that must be given its independence.  If you try to cage it, its spirit will die.

 To be an artist is to be a complete person: to embrace all the parts of ourselves.

One of the messages I took from my time with John Philip was that it’s up to me to create the world I want to live in, for myself and for others.  He encouraged me to share my perspective and my experience, because my impact on the world is greater than I realize.  As an artist, my way of communicating with others is through paintings.  Art is an extremely valuable form of communication, but it’s not very direct.  I wanted to engage with people more fully, to make myself useful in the world. Through talking with friends, the idea for creativity workshops was born.

I’ve taught art to children and adults, and I’ve found that each requires a different style of teaching.  Kids have a lot of enthusiasm for art: it comes to them as naturally as walking or breathing.  Teaching them is about managing their energy-levels and introducing art-making methods and materials.  With adults it’s much more complicated; they come to me to learn technical skills, but what I find they need more is a renewed connection to their creativity.  They want to be creative, but they find themselves blocked.  Somewhere in adolescence, we’re introduced to the idea that there’s such a thing as “good” and “bad” art, and we want to make sure we’re not doing it badly.  We become self-conscious, and we stop doing things that we love for fear of judgment.  This is very sad to me, because I feel that art belongs to everyone.  Drawing, sculpting, writing, singing, dancing: these are integral parts of being human.  For someone to give up doing something that brings them joy is to bury a part of themselves.

The idea for the creativity workshops was to take what I’d learned from teaching art to adults, drop the emphasis on technical skills and focus on the creative process.  This way the lessons are applicable to any discipline.  The roadblocks that stop one from painting are the same ones that stop one from dancing, playing an instrument, or writing: it’s all self-judgment.

Over the years that I’ve been working as an artist, I’ve also been practicing Zen meditation and mindfulness practice.  I’ve applied that awareness to the creative process, and I’ve confronted a lot of the obstacles that can get in the way of creative expression.  And here’s the funny part: there really aren’t that many.  If we can learn to spot just a few unhealthy thought-patterns, we can avoid the pitfalls that shut-down our creativity.  Once we see how unhelpful many of our thoughts are, it becomes easier to recognize them and move beyond them.

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The baptism of one of our pilgrims, Kate Collins-Thompson, at Columba’s Bay

The other important part of any creativity workshop is play: we make things because it’s fun.  What are you doing if you’re not judging yourself?  You’re having a good time, experimenting, mixing things together, stacking them up, rolling around on the ground, climbing trees, making music with pots and pans: basically being a kid. It’s from that sense of expansiveness and experimentation that all art comes.  Even a novelist who writes about difficult and painful subjects takes joy in the way the words are put together.  So in each session, however deep the  subjects we’re discussing, we always leave time for fun.  We draw without looking at our paper, make sculptures out of unusual materials, and come up with new ways of composing poems.  We also do exercises that get us thinking outside the box, which can expand our capacity for creative thinking.

What I’ve found so far is that there’s a strong desire for this sort of workshop.  Everyone who I’ve spoken with would like a deeper connection to their creative side; everyone has a project or craft they’d like to start or work on more often.  Attendees have told me they found the exercises we did to be powerful and important.  The most exciting parts for me have been when I have stepped back and let the participants share their experiences.  There’s so much wisdom in every roomful of people; sometimes all we need is for someone to suggest a subject to speak on.  The group conversations foster a sense of community and of shared-experience that is vital to any creative life.

So far I’ve held workshops in Minnesota and California.  Those sessions were held to an hour and a half, but the more I look into this subject, the more I realize there is to do.  So next will come a four-part series in my home-town of Asheville, North Carolina, that will allow us to approach this subject in greater depth.

As I plan my workshops, I think about the time I spent on Iona and about the example that John Philip sets for all of us.  He embodies that spirit of play, of self-acceptance, and the willingness to look deeply into the darker sides of life when that is what’s called for.  To be an artist is to be a complete person: to embrace all the parts of ourselves.  When we live in cultures that are built around shame, conformity, and self-improvement, it takes a lot of bravery to accept oneself.  That journey to self-acceptance is at the heart of spirituality, and it’s also necessary to live a full, creative life.

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Ian Brownlee and his wife Kathryn Shanks live in Asheville, NC. Ian received a scholarship from Heartbeat to attend the Iona Pilgrimage with John Philip Newell in September of 2015. Please visit his website, Art By Ian Brownlee and learn more about his Creativity Workshops.

Giving Tuesday

Will you join us? It is Giving Tuesday and we are hoping that you will take a moment to send a gift to Heartbeat. Your generosity helps us advance our Celtic vision, provide scholarships for pilgrimage and retreat, and create environments for interfaith and intergenerational relationship. Our work is needed now, more than ever, and we need you to help us accomplish our mission!
http://heartbeatjourney.org/donate-now/

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2014 Camino Peace Pilgrimage Cohort

Join Heartbeat’s community of supporters and the movement of healing and transformation by making a contribution today. Together we can make a difference!

A Prayer for Today | John Philip Newell

Be strong, O my soul,

Be strong this day

To face this moment and feel its pain

To cry with our mothers and weep for our daughters

To stand by our fathers and sons of colour

And defend our true brothers and sisters of the Qu’ran

To serve compassion rather than fear

To invoke wisdom instead of ignorance

 To elect humility over false pride

Be strong, O my soul,

Be strong this day

Be strong this day for love.

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John Philip Newell

November 9, 2016JPN_(Iona_MN)

Board Member Transitions: An Abundance of Gratitude

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Front row from left: Ben Lindwall, John Philip Newell, Robert McClellan. Middle row: Ali Newell, Margaret Anne Fohl. Back row: Frannie Kieschnick, Roy Barsness, Helenmarie Zachritz, Vanessa Johnson, Karin Baard, Steve Romeyn.

John Philip and Ali Newell nominated two people to join the Board of Directors: Karin Baard and Roy Barsness.

Karin was one of the scholars on the first Camino Peace Pilgrimage in 2014 and just finished co-leading a trip with Rob McClellan on the same route. She was also a participant in our Pilgrimage Training last summer. Karin is from Brunswick, Maine and works with women healing from domestic abuse. She is also fluent in Spanish.

Roy is a professor at the Seattle School of Theology and also a psychologist. He has brought two groups of students to be with John Philip on Iona. He has also organized multiple events featuring John Philip at the Seattle School. Roy is married with two children.

In his second year on the board, Steve Romeyn was elected chair, replacing Vanessa Johnson. Vanessa will stay on the board through next summer, fulfilling her term. John Philip and Ali expressed deepest gratitude to Vanessa for her leadership and guidance during her two years of service in this capacity. Steve moves into the position with extensive business experience as a property developer in the Atlanta Area and with membership on the board for Habitat for Humanity.

Finishing their terms, Helenmarie Zachritz of Española, NM and Mary Ann Bumgarner of Tulsa, OK were honored for their extensive work and guidance as early partners in Heartbeat’s formation. Mary Ann was one of the founding board members for the organization which was first known as The Friends of John Philip Newell and Helenmarie was the first paid director. She resigned and joined the board of directors when Ben Lindwall became Executive Director in 2013. Both Mary Ann and Helenmarie were given Celtic crosses from the Isle of Iona to commemorate their involvement.

Our Journey Forward

Image 11-3-16 at 11.17 AMOver a year ago the Heartbeat board launched a project to create a strategic plan to bring clarity and focus to the organization’s work. A survey was sent to Heartbeat supporters on February 15, 2016 in an effort to understand perception and hear feedback. A special committee convened in Palo Alto, CA on February 22, 2016 to lay a foundation for this process, led by consultant Ted Scott of Larkspur California. Ted was recommended by board member Rob McClellan because of his extensive experience in guiding churches, non-profits, and companies through change. He was instrumental in naming Heartbeat’s work and guiding the board on a path to move the process forward. After the initial meeting, Steve Romeyn, Ben Lindwall, and Ted Scott continued the process and worked with the entire board to make adjustments, understand, and commit to the plan that was being developed. The plan was then presented and approved during the Annual Board Meeting.

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During this process, it became apparent that it was time to update Heartbeat’s Identity Statements to more accurately reflect the work of the organization. The subtitle was slightly adjusted from “A Journey Towards Earth’s Wellbeing” to “A Sacred Journey Towards Earth’s Wellbeing”. We also developed new purpose, mission and vision statements. They are as follows:

Purpose:

Advancing the Celtic vision of John Philip and Ali Newell, listening for the heartbeat of the Sacred in all things.

Vision:

Healing in the world by honoring the earth and strengthening relationship across faiths, nations, races, genders, generations, and economic divides.

Mission :

Expanding sacred vision, deepening spiritual practice, nurturing reflective community, and enabling action for change.

This guided the finalization of our strategic plan, which has three specific goals, each containing a list of strategies:

Advance the Celtic vision of John Philip and Ali Newell

  • Promote JPN Message
  • Promote JPN Events
  • Support Celtic Consciousness Schools
  • Promote Heartbeat activities

Foster engagement through pilgrimage and action initiatives

  • Develop action initiatives
  • Expand Heartbeat Pilgrimage Program
  • Develop Heartbeat Gatherings
  • Offer scholarships for pilgrimage, retreat and special projects 

Increase funding for operations, scholarship, pilgrimage, events, and projects

  • Solicit funds through letters, advertising, meetings and phone calls
  • Cultivate Heartbeat donor community
  • Grow new donor base
  • Win Grants

We expect this plan to bring clarity and focus to the work of Heartbeat as the organization grows and matures.