The Heartbeat of God

In honor of the start of the 2018 School of Celtic Consciousness this week with its location in California, the following excerpt will be from the SCC’s required reading: Listening for the Heartbeat of God.

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One of the primary marks of Celtic spirituality, its belief in the essential goodness of creation, is prominent in the works of Scott and MacDonald. They believed that the natural world is infinitely deep. Everything in creation has issued forth from the invisible and contains something of the unseen life of God. Otherwise it would cease to exist. Because God’s life is like the heartbeat at the centre of life, pulsating within, sustaining all that is, MacDonald’s princess[1] is aware of and alert to the Soul of creation.  She has a sense of relationship with it, for all created things are an expression of God for our souls to see and feel. God is forever communicating his life and love in and through the outward forms of creation. The young princess is portrayed as greeting the flowering fields in the morning and seeing the connection between the light and the mystery of the night skies and the beauty and love of the grandmother. The one is an expression of the other.

Just as an infant comes to know his mother through form and colour, scent and sound, so we come to a knowledge of God through the universe. ‘Those who have a child’s heart,’ said Scott, ‘will own and welcome this.’[2] Again, the emphasis is on becoming like a child, recovering the inner faculties we were born with and using them to glimpse the presence of the spirit in created matter. Scott underlined the need to regain our innate childlike way of seeing that becomes increasingly obscured by neglect throughout our lives. The gift of the imagination, which in a child is still uninhibited, allows creation to be a lens through which we may fleetingly bring into focus aspects of the eternal. The young princess in MacDonald’s story is surrounded by people whose inner senses and imagination have been so dulled by lack of use that they believe there is nothing to see in the matter of creation. Their blindness is an omen of the materialism that was increasingly to grip the Western world as the nineteenth century progressed.

John Philip Newell, Listening for the Heartbeat of God, Paulist Press, 1997, pp.64-5.

Photo by Daiga Ellaby on Unsplash

 


[1] Refers to one of MacDonald’s best-known novels, The Princess and the Goblin (1872). It tells the story of a young princess living in a great country house. She discovers that in the house, in one of its remote attic rooms, is a beautiful woman, in whom the freshness of youth is combined with the wisdom of the ages. Although she has always been present, like a grandmother watching over the princess and her family, and has been known to the king and others before, the princess meets her for the first time early in the story. She sits spinning a thread of light that is woven through all things, and which she instructs the young princess to hold wherever she is in order to feel her presence and be led to her. Others in the house see neither the beautiful woman nor her thread of light, and her room, which is to the young princess the most wonderful of places, filled with the scent of wild roses and the sound of the world’s flowing waters, is to others merely an empty attic, dusty and forsaken.     The eternal mother is present to nurture and to guide, but present too are terrible forces of darkness plotting destruction. Within the mountain on which the house is built, living in subterranean caves, are goblins that tunnel their way into the foundations of the house, threaten its safety and intend to take the princess captive. The goblins are neither human nor animal, but a distorted and evil combination of the two. In the end their evil is self-destructive. The flood they had planned for the destruction of the house is turned on them and on their caves. The princess, having followed the beautiful woman’s thread, escapes safely and, although the foundations of her house have been shaken by evil, they are not destroyed.

[2] Alexander J. Scott, ‘Introductory Discourse on Revelation’, Lectures on the Epistle to the Romans, Darling, 1838, p. 4.